The “Yu-gi-oh!” Experience

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“And this is the card I sleep with every night!”

As a middle-schooler I was obsessed with Yu-gi-oh!, just like I was with Pokemon. I didn’t think about it at the time, but there’s a lot of key features within the actual show that may or may not have defined the “Card Game” genre, which eventually expanded to other things including spinning tops and bead battler toys. As an anime itself, it was a little unbelievable, looking back on it now.

 

The anime itself, before the multiple spin-offs (which included Yu-gi-oh! GX, Yu-go-oh! 5Ds, and Yu-gi-oh! Zexel), came in about five seasons. It started off with a group of middle-schoolers (of which, only the main character Yugi looked the appropriate age) that liked to play a game called Duel Monsters. If you’re unfamiliar, it’s basically the classic card game War with a few extra things.

The Japanese version is actually quite a bit different, including a complete removal of the true episode one, but that’s a whole other can of worms we won’t go into (stupid 4Kids). Anyway, the entire anime is basically a series of Duel Monsters tournaments in different locations, and an episode usually consists of an entire card game or sometimes even a small part of a card game. If I recall correctly, at least twice, a game extends four to five C_l2hNLXUAAbddiepisodes.

While I’m sure this is an excellent marketing tactic for the company that owns Yu-gi-oh!, going back and watching it now, as an adult, has made me realize how rediculous the show actually is. First, the main character has some kind of ancient spirit within him, thanks to his super cool necklace called The Millenium Puzzle, but he apparently doesn’t realize this until midway through season one. The irony being that he magically transforms into this spirit before every duel, which does nothing to him except make him look more serious, about a foot and a half taller, and have a much deeper voice.

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“This is how we get all the chicks!”

Also, the games apparently require the use of holographics to make them super cool and playable, so the characters use special arenas to make their monsters come to life. But, sometimes the monsters actually hurt the people. Like, losing actually causes physical pain sometimes, according to a few episodes, and as the series goes on, the monsters seem to get more and more real. I constantly found myself asking “Do they realize this is just a card game?” Apparently not, because the bratty Seto Kaiba decides to throw a tournament just to defeat Yugi, and when he loses, blows up a whole island.

While this genre is mostly aimed at young boys in middle school, it does sometimes draw older people, especially if they grew up in the Pokemon and Yu-gi-oh! era. For me, however, it’s just background noise while I update any various social media sites I have or play videogames.

“Hayate the Combat Butler” Review

So, as you might have noticed, it’s been quite a long time since I’ve used this blog. Since

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“How very dare you!”

then, I’ve changed the name to go along with my new book-in-progress. Besides, I’d rather write anime reviews than have a set schedule of writing stuff. So, this blog won’t necessarily be a weekly thing, rather I will be posting as I watch series, with occasional character profiles sprinkled in. Feel free to browse the other posts, as I’ve removed all non-anime and non-Japanese posts.

Anyway, enough dawdling! Having finished Hayate the Combat Butler about a week ago, I had been throwing the idea back and forth of even writing a review since it’s not as fresh in my min as I’d like it to be. But, I figured it would be a nice place to start reviewing again. Either way, the first series (noted as “seasons 1&2” on Crunchyroll) is very lighthearted and funny. It’s designed as a comedy with slice of life elements.

Nagi Sanzenin is an extremely rich girl who is the product of a trust fund, and to top it off, she’s actually very smart, though headstrong. She lives in a gigantic mansion with her maid Maria, her pet tiger Tama, and her old semi-retired butler Klaus. On the other hand, Hayate is an unfortunate high-schooler with absent parents who’ve places him in a huge, unbearable debt of 150 million yen (1,325,991 USD according to Google). Of course, a 16-year-old has  no way of paying this back, even though he’s been lying about his age since he was 8 to get some kind of job.

The story starts when Hayate runs into Nagi (who has run away again) at the park and plots to kidnap her for the money. Nagi misunderstands and takes it as a confession (it also doesn’t help that Hayate is too nice to actually do it), but then she actually does get kidnapped by real criminals. Hayate saves her, of course, in the most rediculous way possible, and she sort of adopts him as her new personal butler. The irony being that he’s had so many physical jobs, he literally makes the perfect butler.

So begins the story, where Nagi is always getting into trouble, skipping school, and trying to constantly hint that she loves Hayate. He’s completely clueless, of course, and along with tons of pop culture references, the entirely female cast of characters (save Tama and Klaus) begin to fall for Hayate who is still completely clueless.

It’s actually a very entertaining anime, filled with rediculous situations. The third series “Cuties” is not nearly as well done, and they even hired a new animator, so I don’t necessarily recommend that one. However, I’d have to give this anime a 7.5 out of 10 on my ratings scale, and encourage you to check it out at least once.

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